WELCOME TO THE AIRCRAFT NOISE INFORMATION TOOL

With this tool you can review predicted aircraft noise at specific addresses.


HOW TO USE THIS AIRCRAFT NOISE TOOL

Please note:
- Ordinary Google Maps navigation is enabled in the map.
- For more information about each menu item, hover/click the corresponding information icon.

NOISE METRIC MENUS
1. Click the ANEF / ANEC or N-above Contours buttons to select the noise metric you want to view. The selected type will be highlighted blue.

NOISE CONTOURS FOR DIFFERENT SCENARIOS
2. Click on the scenario you want to view (2018 Master Plan, 2013 Master Plan or 2003 Master Plan / MAEO, with sub-scenarios for the 2018 Master Plan presenting Two and Four Runway scenarios). The scenario will be highlighted in blue and a contour will be shown on the map.
3. To 'lock' a scenario on, click and hold the scenario name, until the scenario is highlighted yellow.

ADDRESS SEARCH
4. Search for an address by typing in the address box at the top of the map.
5. Either select the address in the drop-down list or press enter when you have finished typing.
6. To clear the address and search another, retype into the address box.

FLIGHT PATH CORRIDORS
7. Click on the "Show/hide flight corridors" button to display indicative flight paths corridors.
8. Select the flight path corridors to present. These are classified by the direction of travel on the runway.
(Note that this functionality may cause the noise tool to run slowly on some devices)

TERMS OF USE

Important notice


This information is made available by Melbourne Airport. You should be aware that some of this information:


  • Is illustrative or conceptual only.
  • Relates to current and future matters, and is based on certain modelling and assumptions.
  • Represents historical and forecast aircraft movements and indicative flight path levels. This will change from time to time.
  • Melbourne Airport cannot guarantee (and makes no representation) as to the accuracy of this information, including the location of current or future flight paths around Melbourne Airport. Information received via the noise tool should not be relied upon for personal, medical, legal or financial decisions.
  • While care has been taken developing this data and ensuring it is accurate and up-to-date, it is provided for information purposes only, based on data available as at the time of development. To the extent permitted by law you release Melbourne Airport from all liability (including negligence) for any use of, or reliance on this information, by you or any other party.

By continuing and closing this window you are agreeing to these "Terms of Use".

Land Use Planning and the ANEF

ANEF / ANEC

For land use planning in Australia, the accepted measure of aircraft noise exposure is the Australian Noise Exposure Forecast (ANEF).

The ANEF is a forecast of future aircraft noise exposure based on the:
- Expected aircraft movement numbers
- Types of aircraft
- Daily distribution by time period of arrivals and departures
- Configuration of the runways
- Arrival and departure tracks flown.

Contours which are calculated using the same methods as ANEF contours, but which have not been formally endorsed, are known as Australian Noise Exposure Concept (ANEC) contours.

Land Use Planning and the ANEF

ANEF / ANEC

For land use planning in Australia, the accepted measure of aircraft noise exposure is the Australian Noise Exposure Forecast (ANEF).

The ANEF is a forecast of future aircraft noise exposure based on the:
- Expected aircraft movement numbers
- Types of aircraft
- Daily distribution by time period of arrivals and departures
- Configuration of the runways
- Arrival and departure tracks flown.

Contours which are calculated using the same methods as ANEF contours, but which have not been formally endorsed, are known as Australian Noise Exposure Concept (ANEC) contours.

Long-Term Number of Noise Events Above

Number of Noise Events Above (e.g. N70, N65, N60)

Contours indicating the number of aircraft noise events above a certain noise level are termed "Number Above" or "N-above" contours.

Standards Australia Handbook "Acoustics - Guidance on producing information on aircraft noise" and National Airports Safeguarding Framework (NASF) Guideline A promulgate the use of N-above metrics to supplement the ANEF system.

Consistent with the thresholds suggested by NASF Guideline A, this noise tool provides long-term forecasts for N70, N65 and N60 contours.

The long-term N-above contours presented by the tool were prepared for the 2018 Master Plan and are consistent the noise modelling for the current ANEF.

These N-above contours are a composite of the predictions for the existing (two runway) and future (three and four runway) configurations anticipated at Melbourne Airport.

Flight Path Corridors

Flight path corridors indicate where aircraft are typically expected to fly.

Indicative flight path corridors are included for four runway scenarios modelled as part of the Runway Development Program (RDP) or 2018 Master Plan.

Flight path corridors for other scenarios are not available.

Current Ruleset

Explanation here

N70 24-hour: Two Runway 2023

The two-runway scenario considers noise surrounding Melbourne Airport with the existing runways.

N70 describes the number of aircraft noise events per day exceeding 70 A-weighted decibels (dBA).

A noise level of 70 dBA outside a building will generally result in an internal noise level of approximately 60 dBA, if windows are open to a normal extent. This noise level is generally sufficient to disturb conversation, in that a speaker will generally be forced to raise their voice to be understood.

N60 Night (11pm-6am): Two Runway 2023

The two-runway scenario considers noise surrounding Melbourne Airport with the existing runways.

The N60 describes the number of events exceeding 60 A-weighted decibels (dBA) external to a building.p>

60 dBA externally would typically result in a maximum noise level of 50 dBA within a building having windows open to a normal extent. N60, calculated for the night-time period, is considered to reasonably describe the number of events which may in some circumstances cause awakenings.

2018 Master Plan ANEC 1 (Existing Runways)

The current ANEF is a composite of predictions accounting for the existing and future runway configurations of the airport.

ANEC 1 considers the existing two-runway configuration.

2018 Master Plan ANEC 4 (Proposed 3rd and Future 4th Runways)

The current ANEF is a composite of predictions accounting for the existing and future runway configurations of the airport.

ANEC 4 considers a four-runway configuration, with parallel east-west and north-south runways.

2018 Master Plan ANEF

The 2018 Master Plan includes updates to the ANEF for Melbourne Airport. Endorsement for the new ANEF is currently being sought.

The ANEF is a composite of predictions accounting for the existing and future runway configurations of the airport.

Two (ANEC 1), three (ANEC 2 and ANEC 5) and four (ANEC 4) runway configurations are included in the forecasts.

2013 Master Plan ANEF

The current ANEF for Melbourne Airport was prepared and endorsed as part of the 2013 Master Plan.

The ANEF is a composite of predictions accounting for the existing and future runway configurations of the airport.

Two, three and four runway configurations are included in the forecasts.

Melbourne Airport Environs Overlay (MAEO)

Land use planning restrictions around Melbourne Airport are achieved through the Victoria Planning Provisions Melbourne Airport Environs Overlay (MAEO).

The current MAEO came into effect in May 2007 and is based on the ANEF at that time, which was prepared and endorsed as part of the 2003 Master Plan.

MAEO 1 corresponds to the 2003 Master Plan ANEF 25, whilst MAEO 2 corresponds to the ANEF 20.

The 2003 Master Plan ANEF and the MAEO are very similar, however the MAEO differs slightly because it follows some property boundaries. For simplicity, this noise tool approximates MAEO 1 and MAEO 2 using the ANEF 25 and 20 from the 2003 Master Plan respectively. For land-use planning and other matters relating to the MAEO, accurate information should be sought from the relevant planning authority.

2018 Master Plan N70 24-hour

The most commonly-used noise descriptor in the N-above system is N70, the number of aircraft noise events per day exceeding 70 dBA.

A noise level of 70 A-weighted decibels (dBA) outside a building will generally result in an internal noise level of approximately 60 dBA, if windows are open to a normal extent. This noise level is generally sufficient to disturb conversation, in that a speaker will generally be forced to raise their voice to be understood.

An internal aircraft noise level of 60 dBA is likely to also cause some words to be missed in speech from a television or radio.

N70 values indicate the number of times per day when aircraft noise events exceeding 70 dBA are predicted.

2018 Master Plan N65 24-hour

N65 values indicate the number of times per day when aircraft noise events exceeding 65 A-weighted decibels (dBA) are predicted.

N65 is occasionally used to supplement the N70 metric. 65 dBA could be considered as a useful indicator when conversation outdoors might be interrupted by aircraft noise.

2018 Master Plan N60 24-hour

N60 values indicate the number of times per day when aircraft noise events exceeding 60 A-weighted decibels (dBA) are predicted.

60 dBA is likely to represent a noise level that is clearly noticeable, but may not be attention grabbing for many people.

Noise levels within buildings being exposed to 60 dBA outside are unlikely to disrupt many daytime activities, such as ordinary conversation or watching television.

2018 Master Plan N60 Night (11pm to 6am)

For assessment of night time noise impacts, it is customary to consider N60 values. The N60 describes the number of events exceeding 60 A-weighted decibels (dBA) external to a building.

60 dBA externally would typically result in a maximum noise level of 50 dBA within a building having windows open to a normal extent. If this were the case in a room where a person is sleeping, a 50 dBA maximum noise level is considered to be close to the point at which noise may cause awakening.

It should be noted that research suggests the probability of awakening from 50 dBA LAmax is small. Hence N60, calculated for the night-time period, is considered to reasonably describe the number of events which may in some circumstances cause awakenings.

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